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Hey Dr. BBQ, interesting New Year's resolution


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Posted by Dan in Norcal on January 17, 2013 at 13:05:17:

Saw this link and your New Year's resolution:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/all-we-can-eat/post/the-barbecue-world-looks-back----and-forward/2013/01/07/e2e7eb12-58eb-11e2-88d0-c4cf65c3ad15_blog.html

Ray Lampe, a.k.a. Dr. BBQ , champion competitor and author of seven cookbooks. “For 2013, I resolve to use genuine low-and-slow barbecue techniques in my cooking. No more of this hot-and-fast braising shortcutting. This faux barbecue lacks the attributes that make the real thing so special, like the crispy bark, the smoky twang and that texture that can only be achieved by long-and-slow cooking.”

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Just wondering, have you tried a blind taste test and could you or most BBQ judges/cooks really pick out which brisket, pork or ribs were cooked hot-n-fast versus low-n-slow? Also, at what temperature threshold do you consider it hot-n-fast? Above 275?

It seems a lot of BBQ competitors nowadays are cooking ribs at 275 and more are cooking pork and brisket hot and fast too (like Myron and winning!). I agree that the bark seems to be not as smokey or crisp, but it doesn't seem to be an impediment to winning... That being said, could you or most CBJ's pick out which boxes of pork or brisket were cooked by each method based on the bark? Is the bark REALLY that much different? And is there anything a hot-n-fast cook could do to get better bark?

Not trying to stir anything up, just curious.... Also, I've enjoyed all of your books so far! My fave is still your first Big Time BBQ book. Thanks, Ray.



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